Devi Suktam

Declaration of the Creator
"The eternal and infinite consciousness is I."

Devi Suktam is a Vedic expression.

Veda is uncreated, eternal and non-changing.

Veda is ("heard") beyond the physical senses.

Veda is supreme knowledge — the language of nature itself.

Apauruṣeyā (not of human) and therefore not the original oral codification or Vedic Sanskrit scripture! These are facsimiles of the uncreated, eternal and non-changing Veda itself and also the Devi Suktam.

"I am the Queen, the gatherer-up of treasures, most thoughtful, first of those who merit worship. Thus Gods have established me in many places with many homes to enter and abide in. Through me alone all eat the food that feeds them, – each man who sees, breathes, hears the word outspoken. They know it not, yet I reside in the essence of the Universe. Hear, one and all, the truth as I declare it. I, verily, myself announce and utter the word that Gods and men alike shall welcome. I make the man I love exceeding mighty, make him nourished, a sage, and one who knows Brahman. I bend the bow for Rudra [Shiva], that his arrow may strike, and slay the hater of devotion. I rouse and order battle for the people, I created Earth and Heaven and reside as their Inner Controller. On the world's summit I bring forth sky the Father: my home is in the waters, in the ocean as Mother. Thence I pervade all existing creatures, as their Inner Supreme Self, and manifest them with my body. I created all worlds at my will, without any higher being, and permeate and dwell within them.The eternal and infinite consciousness is I, it is my greatness dwelling in everything."

— Devi Sukta, Rig Veda 10.125.3 – 10.125.8


The following passages from Wikipedia --

The Devi Upanishad comprises 32 verses after an invocation from the Atharvaveda. The text describes the goddess as the highest principle,and the ultimate truth in the universe (Brahman).


The foundational premises of reverence for the feminine, as stated in the Devi Upanishad, are present in the Rigveda, in the following hymn,


I am the Queen,

the gatherer-up of treasures, most thoughtful, first of those who merit worship.

I load with wealth the zealous sacrificer who pours the juice and offers his oblation.

Thus Gods have established me in many places with many homes to enter and abide in.

Through me alone all eat the food that feeds them, – each man who sees, breathes, hears the word out spoken.

They know it not, yet they dwell beside me. Hear, one and all, the truth as I declare it.

I, verily, myself announce and utter the word that Gods and men alike shall welcome.

I make the man I love exceedingly mighty, make him sage, a Rsi, and a Brahman.

I bend the bow for Rudra that his arrow may strike and slay the hater of devotion.

I rouse and order battle for the people, and I have penetrated Earth and Heaven.

On the world's summit I bring forth the Father: my home is in the waters, in the ocean.

Thence I extend o'er all existing creatures, and touch even yonder heaven with my forehead.

I breathe a strong breath like the wind and tempest, the while I hold together all existence.

Beyond the wide earth and beyond the heavens I have become so mighty in my grandeur.

I move with Rudras and Vasus, with Ā dityas and Visvedevas,

Mitra and Varuņa, Indra and Agni, I support, and the two Aśvins.

I uphold Soma, Tvaşțr, Pūşan and Bhaga,

The wide-stepping Vishnu, Brahma, Prajāpati.


— Devi Sukta, Rigveda 10.125.3 – 10.125.8, [12][19][23]


The Devi Upanishad, in a manner similar to this Rigvedic hymn, asserts that from the Goddess arise Prakṛti (matter) and Purusha (consciousness), she is bliss and non-bliss, from her emerged the Vedas and what is different from it, the born and the unborn, and all of the universe.[18][17] She suggests that "Brahman and non-Brahman must be known", that she is all the five elements, as well as all that is different from these elements, what is above, what is below, what is around, and thus the universe in its entirety.[24]

In the present day, the sūkta is popularly chanted during the worship of the Devī (Universal Goddess in any form), in the daily rituals of temples, ...

https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Dev%C4%ABs%C5%ABkta